Matt Tucker

More than just a name change

Blog Post created by Matt Tucker Champion on Jan 16, 2007

Today, the the Jabber Software Foundation announced that it's now the XMPP Standards Foundation. Already, a lot of content has been moved to xmpp.org from jabber.org. The change is symbolic of much that's happening with the protocol:

  • Explosive growth -- Almost every week a new network or product seems to announce XMPP support (although we're all still waiting for another major consumer IM network to follow Google's lead). The XMPP standard is also rapidly evolving in areas like VoIP with Jingle and advanced presence with Personal Eventing via Pubsub. We've seen the growth trend at igniterealtime.org as well -- we're nearing 1 million downloads of Wildfire and on the verge of making our most significant set of product releases ever.

  • The slow death of SIMPLE -- two years ago the story was about how the SIMPLE protocol was winning the real-time standards war against XMPP. Now, only Microsoft is left beating the SIMPLE drum and that complicated, bloated mess of a protocol is fading into irrelevance. Microsoft is still the most important player in the corporate IM world, but at least we don't all have to pretend anymore that they're pursuing an open protocol. XMPP is the only way to have open federation, which is why products like Lotus are adding support.

  • Open for business -- Jabber started as an Open Source project and the Jabber Software Foundation began its life in that tradition. It wasn't that long ago that the organization didn't have a reputation for being friendly to companies looking to adopt the protocol. All that's changed now and the JSF to XSF name change re-enforces  that trend. I'm proud to be part of an organization that's pushing the boundaries for how Open Source and commercial interests work together to develop an open protocol.

Last year, a blog entry claiming that 2006 would be the "year of XMPP" got a fair amount of circulation. Indeed, a lot of great stuff happened last year, but 2007 is truly the year we'll see everything come together for XMPP.

 

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